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Posts Tagged ‘Europe’

Barcelona, Spain

October 2011

[See the complete album here.]

Nothing in between me and the rain
And you can’t save me now
I’m in the grip of a hurricane

No hope, don’t want shelter, no calm
Nothing to keep me from the storm
And you can’t hold me down
Cause I belong to the hurricane
It’s going to blow this all away
— Florence + The Machine, “Hurricane Drunk”

[See the complete album here.]

[All pictures taken and edited by me; pictures of me taken by Scott.]

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Råshult, the home of Carl Linnaeus, Sweden

June 2011

[See the complete album here!]

“Fragrance may well be the signature of eternity.” (Marcel “Bunny” LeFever)

“The physical frontiers have been conquered. The Industrial Revolution has shot its steely wad. In our age of high technology, the rough and tough manifestations of mammalian sensibility are no longer a help but a hindrance. (And the vestiges of reptilian sensibility, with its emphasis on territory and defense, are dangerous to an insane degree.) We require a less physically aggressive, less rugged human being now. We need a more relaxed, contemplative, gentle, flexible kind of person, for only he or she can survive (and expedite) this very new system that is upon us. Only he or she can participate in the next evolutionary phase. It has definite spiritual overtones, this floral phase of consciousness.” (Dr. Wiggs Dannyboy)

Jitterbug Perfume, by Tom Robbins

[See the complete album here!]

[Images by Kelly Overvold; pictures of Kelly taken by Scott Zaban.]

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Huseby, Sweden

June 2011

[See the complete album here!]

“As the Age of Reptiles was drawing to a close, the first flowers and mammals appeared. Marcel LeFever believes that the flowers actually eliminated the great reptiles. Mammals also may have contributed to their egress (not “exit”), because for many early mammals there was nothing quite like a couple of dinosaur eggs for breakfast.” (Dr. Wiggs Dannyboy)

–Tom Robbins’ Jitterbug Perfume

[See the complete album here!]

[Images by Kelly Overvold; pictures of Kelly taken by Scott Zaban.]

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While I was in Prague this summer, I read Milan Kundera’s magnificent and heartbreaking novel, The Unbearable Lightness of Being. The story takes place in Prague in 1968, during the Prague Spring and the subsequent Soviet occupation. Tomáš, Tereza, Sabina, and Franz are the four characters through whose lives, loves, and losses the insignificance of life and the fate of the individual are examined.

What better place to lose oneself in one of Kundera’s passionate novels than in Prague, where the author attended university and the setting for most of his books. From the top of Petřín hill to the old castle grounds at Vyšehrad perched above the Vltava River, the city of Prague encapsulates a beauty, mystery, and romance reflected in the poignant and sometimes surreal writing of Milan Kundera.

{View of Prague Castle from Petřín hill}

{Petřín hill}

{View from Petřín hill with Prague castle in the distance}

{View of the Vltava, Prague castle, and Petřín hill from Vyšehrad castle}

{View from Vyšehrad castle}

Recently, while browsing through Free People’s blog, BLDG 25, I stumbled upon some posts from their Book Club series featuring Unbearable Lightness of Being pairing favorite quotes with images that evoke the sentiment of the novel. Here are some of my favorites…

“chance and chance alone has a message for us. everything that occurs out of necessity, everything expected, repeated day in and day out, is mute. only chance can speak to us. we read its message much as gypsies read the images made by coffee grounds at the bottom of a cup.”

“while people are fairly young and the musical composition of their lives is still in its opening bars, they can go about writing it together and exchange motifs…but if they meet when they are older, their musical compositions are more or less complete, and every motif, every object, every word means something different to each of them.”

“When the heart speaks, the mind finds it indecent to object.”

“…and finally there is the fourth category, the rarest, the category of people who live in the imaginary eyes of those who are not present.  they are the dreamers.”

See more of Free People’s favorite quotes from the book here, here, and here.

[Images by Kelly Overvold, from amazon.com, and from blog.freepeople.com.]

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Rome, Italy

March 2010

[See the complete album here!]

“A man within a woman, nay, a god,
Speaks through her spoken word:
I therefore, who have heard,
Must suffer change, and shall be mine no more.
She lured me from the paths I whilom trod.
Borne from my former state by her away,
I stand aloof, and mine own self deplore.
Above all vain desire
The beauty of her face doth lift my clay;
All lesser loveliness seems charnel mire.
O lady, who through fire
And water leadest souls to joys eterne,
Let me no more unto myself return.”
— Michelangelo

[See the complete album here!]

[Images by Kelly Overvold and Scott Zaban.]

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Florence, Italy

March 2010

[See the complete album here!]

“I slow diver won’t touch
the rock bottom of youth

now I fish out only
salty broken torsos

Apollo appears to me in dreams
with the face of a fallen Persian

poetry’s auguries are false
it all happened differently

the epic’s fire was different
the city’s fire was different

heroes did not return from the expedition
there were no heroes
the unworthy survived

I am seeking a statue
drowned in my youth

only an empty pedestal remains—
the trace of a hand seeking a form”

—from “To Apollo,” by Zbigniew Herbert

[See the complete album here!]

[Images by Kelly Overvold and Scott Zaban.]

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Venice, Italy

March 2010

[See the complete album here!]

“I stood in Venice, on the Bridge of Sighs,
A palace and a prison on each hand:
I saw from out the wave her structures rise
As from the stroke of the enchanter’s wand:
A thousand years their cloudy wings expand
Around me, and a dying Glory smiles
O’er the far times, when many a subject land
Looked to the wingéd Lion’s marble piles,
Where Venice sate in state, throned on her hundred isles!

“In Venice Tasso’s echoes are no more,
And silent rows the songless gondolier;
Her palaces are crumbling to the shore,
And music meets not always now the ear:
Those days are gone–but Beauty still is here;
States fall, arts fade–but Nature doth not die,
Nor yet forget how Venice once was dear,
The pleasant place of all festivity,
The revel of the earth, the masque of Italy!”
— from “Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage,” by Lord Byron

[See the complete album here!]

[Images by Kelly Overvold and Scott Zaban.]

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